26th International Microlensing Conference

Celebrating the 30th anniversary of the first microlensing results

Dates: January 31–February 2, 2024

Location: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, USA

Topics

The science topics of the conference are anything related to microlensing, including (but not limited to):

  • Astrometric microlensing
  • Interferometric microlensing
  • Detection of free-floating planets, exoplanets, brown dwarfs, stars and binaries, and compact objects
  • Cold planet demographics (observational constraints and theory)
  • Stellar populations and their properties in the Milky Way (and other galaxies)
  • Search for electromagnetic signatures of gravitational-wave sources through microlensing
  • Synergies between ground-based facilities and/or space missions (Gaia, Roman, Euclid, Rubin, ELTs, etc.)
  • Data mining, numerical tools, and techniques

In addition to typical conference activities, the conference will also pay tribute to the original MACHO, OGLE, and EROS surveys.

Registration and Abstract Submission

Registration is now closed.

We will reach out to registered participants with details on how to pay the conference fees shortly.

The conference fees rates will be:

  • In person: $205
  • Limited remote: Free

In addition to the contributed science talks, we invite the community to submit abstracts for a special 30th anniversary session on the celebration of the results and history of microlensing.

Science Organizing Committee

  • William Dawson (LLNL)
  • Subo Dong (Peking University)
  • Eamonn Kerins (University of Manchester)
  • Katarzyna Kruszyńska (Las Cumbres Observatory)
  • Radek Poleski (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)
  • Clément Ranc (Institut 'Astrophysique de Paris)
  • Nicholas Rattenbury (University of Auckland)
  • Rachel Street (Las Cumbres Observatory)
  • Katie Vandorou (NASA GSFC / University of Maryland)

Local Organizing Committee

  • Natasha Abrams (University of California, Berkeley)
  • Megan Eckart (LLNL)
  • Macy Huston (University of California, Berkeley)
  • Amanda Lewis (LLNL)
  • Erika Lopez (LLNL)
  • Scott Perkins (LLNL)
  • Connie Ruvalcaba-Olson (LLNL)

Conference Co-Chairs

  • William Dawson (LLNL)
  • Łukasz Wyrzykowski (Warsaw University Observatory)
  • Peter McGill (LLNL)

Additional information relating to the conference will be added to this webpage as it becomes available.

Getting to Livermore

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is in Livermore, California, about 45 miles east of San Francisco.

There are three international airports that are comparable distances from Livermore:

  • San Francisco International Airport (SFO), distance to Livermore: 50 miles
  • Oakland International Airport (OAK), distance to Livermore: 31 miles
  • San Jose International Airport (SJC), distance to Livermore: 35 miles

From SFO and OAK, Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) runs directly from the airports to Dublin/Pleasanton, which is about 8 miles from Livermore.

From SJC, you can connect to BART by taking VTA Route 60 to the Milpitas BART station and connect to Dublin/Pleasanton.

You can complete the journey to Livermore from Dubin/Pleasanton by taxi or bus route 10R.

Getting to the Conference Venue

The conference will be held at the University of California Livermore Collaboration Center, which is on the east side of the LLNL campus. Conference attendees may access the collaboration center via Eastgate Drive from Greenville Road.

Get directions

The University of California Livermore Collaboration Center is east of campus, just off Eastgate Drive.

Accommodations

There are a limited number of rooms available for $189+tax per night at the Residence Inn by Marriott Livermore at 5200 Wolf House Drive in Livermore. Conference attendees will be responsible for making their own reservations either through the hotel’s website or by calling the hotel at +1-925-606-1980. Individuals must mention they are with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to receive the rate.

Some other hotel options in the Livermore area are:

Courtyard by Marriott Livermore
2929 Constitution Dr, Livermore, CA 94551
(925) 243-1000

Four Points by Sheraton
5115 Hopyard Rd, Pleasanton, CA 94588
(925) 460-8800

Hilton Garden Inn Livermore
2801 Constitution Dr, Livermore, CA 94550
(925) 292-2000

Homewood Suites by Hilton Livermore
5400 Wolf House Dr, Livermore, CA 94551
(925) 606-1984

Registered Attendees

Yu-Chia Lin (University of Arizona)

Franco Mallia (Campo Catino Observatory)

Joshua Blackman (Universität Bern)

Alexander Patrick Stephan (Vanderbilt University)

Scott Gaudi (The Ohio State University)

Yasir Abdul Qadir (University of Turku)

Parisa Sangtarash (Isfahan University of Technology)

Ylana Karolina Santos Lopes (Ylana Karolina Santos Lopes)

Antoine Mérand (European Southern Observatory)

Noam Segev (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Markus Rabus (Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción)

Natasha Abrams (University of California, Berkeley)

Wanggi Lim (Caltech/IPAC)

Etienne Bachelet (Caltech/IPAC)

Keto D. Zhang (Caltech/IPAC)

William DeRocco (University of California, Santa Cruz)

Lukasz Wyrzykowski (Warsaw University Astronomical Observatory)

Victor Oyiboka (Space Generation Advisory Council)

Haibin Ren (Tsinghua University)

Valerio Bozza (University of Salerno, Italy)

Berhe Tewelde Teklhaimanot (University of vale do paraiba)

Katarzyna Kruszynska (Las Cumbres Observatory)

Zexuan Wu (Peking University)

José Pereira da Silva Neto (Federal University of Pernambuco)

Zhecheng Hu (Tsinghua University)

Emmanuel Joliet (Caltech)

Kansuke Nunota (Osaka University)

Uliana Pylypenko (Astronomical Observatory of the University of Warsaw)

Nicholas Rattenbury (The University of Auckland)

Renee Grace Key (Swinburne University of Technology)

Naoki Koshimoto (Osaka University)

Katie Vandorou (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/ UMD)

Clément Ranc (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)

Hongjing Yang (Tsinghua University)

Carina Fian (University of Valencia)

Zofia Kaczmarek (Universität Heidelberg)

Pawel Zielinski (Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun)

Arthur Câmara Mesquita (Brazilian Center for Physics Research)

R. Mark Elowitz (Network for Life Detection)

In-Gu Shin (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian)

Michel Spiro (International Union of Pure and Applied Physics)

Martin Dominik (University of St Andrews)

Franco Mallia (Campo Catino Observatory)

Parisa Sangtarash (Isfahan University of Technology)

Makiko Ban (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)

Macy Huston (University of California, Berkeley)

Anibal Varela (Universidad de San Martin)

Aparna Bhattacharya (University of Maryland College Park)

Arnaud Cassan (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)

Paolo Rota (Università degli Studi di Salerno)

Ahmad Mazidabadi Farahani (Shahid Beheshti University)

Atousa Kalantari (Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences)

Tanay (Dex) Bhadra (University of California, Berkeley)

Anette Brecko (University of California, Berkeley)

Kornel Howil (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)

Tobi Ajagbe (University of Jos)

David Bennett (NASA Goddard and the University of Maryland)

Sebastiano Calchi Novati (Caltech/IPAC)

Sun-Ju Chung (Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute)

Jiyuan Zhang (Tsinghua University)

Hunter Harling (University of California, Berkeley)

Shude Mao (Tsinghua University)

Vito Saggese (University of Naples Federico II)

Qiyue Qian (Tsinghua University)

Weicheng Zang (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian)

Yiannis Tsapras (Heidelberg University)

Raphael Augusto Pereira de Oliveira (University of Warsaw, Astronomical Observatory)

Raquel Forés-Toribio (Universitat de València)

Jennifer Yee (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian)

Akihiko Fukui (University of Tokyo)

Krzysztof Rybicki (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Somayeh Khakpash (Rutgers University)

Ming-Feng Ho (University of California, Riverside)

Jonathan Brashear (Catholic University)

Mateusz Mróz (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)

Efstathia Natalia Rektsini (University of Tasmania)

Greg Olmschenk (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / University of Maryland)

Richard K. Barry (NASA)

Jean-Philippe Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)

Sean K Terry (University of Maryland)

Himanshu Verma (Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India)

Stela Ishitani Silva (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Charles Alcock (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian)

Przemek Mróz (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)

Samson A. Johnson (NASA/JPL)

Marc Moniez (IN2P3)

Michael Albrow (University of Canterbury)

Andrzej Udalski (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)

Radosław Poleski (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)

Andrew Cole (University of Tasmania)

Scott E. Perkins (LLNL)

Ian Bond (Massey University)

Will Dawson (LLNL)

Casey Lam (Carnegie Observatories)

Aníbal Varela (Universidad de San Martín)

George Chapline (LLNL)

David Sweeney (The University of Sydney)

Mário de Oliveira Ferreira (Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas)

Takahiro Sumi (Osaka University)

Martin Makler (San Martín National University & Brazilian Center for Physics Research)

Karen Nowogrodzki (Universidad Nacional de San Martín / ICAS / ICIFI)

Rachel Street (Las Cumbres Observatory)

Farzaneh Zohrabi (Louisiana State University)

José Pereira da Silva Neto (Federal University of Pernambuco)

Subo Dong (Peking University)

Peter McGill (LLNL)

Eamonn Kerins (University of Manchester)

Julie McEnery (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Jessica Lu (University of California, Berkeley)

Matthew Penny (Louisiana State University)

Hannah Gulick (University of California, Berkeley)

Kyle Finner (Caltech/IPAC)

Achille Nucita (University of Salento)

Nolan Smyth (University of California, Santa Cruz)

Abstracts

Agenda

Wednesday, January 31

Time Title Presenter
08:30–08:45 Opening Remarks
08:45–09:00 Microlensing’s Evolution from Brown Dwarf Dark Matter through an “Extragalactic Planet” to the Roman Space Telescope David Bennett (NASA Goddard and University of Maryland)
09:00–09:15 The LMC Asteroid-Mass Primordial black hole Microlensing survey results Renee Grace Key (Swinburne University of Technology)
remote
09:15–09:30 Constraints on primordial black holes as constituents of dark matter based on over 20 years of OGLE observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud Przemek Mróz (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)
09:30–09:45 Does source binarity impact the detection efficiency of black holes by microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds? Marc Moniez (IN2P3)
09:45–10:00 Is it possible to detect effects of wave optics on gravitational lensing? Arthur Câmara Mesquita (Brazilian Center for Physics Research)
remote
10:00–10:15 Gravitational microlensing as a kinematic probe: Rotation curves in five lensed Quasars Carina Fian (University of Valencia)
remote
10:15–10:45 Coffee
10:45–11:00 Eighteen Years of Observations with MOA-2 Ian Bond (Massey University)
11:00–11:15 Microlensing in the Era of All-Sky Surveys Natasha Abrams (University of California, Berkeley)
11:15–11:30 Updates of KMTNet photometry pipeline and systematic reanalysis of history events Hongjing Yang (Tsinghua University)
11:30–11:45 A New LCOGT Key Project for High-magnification Microlensing Events Weicheng Zang (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian)
11:45–12:00 Microlensing Key Projects at Las Cumbres Observatory: Past, Present and Future Yiannis Tsapras (Heidelberg University)
12:00–12:15 A precursor Euclid survey of the Roman fields Jean-Philippe Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)
12:15–12:30 The ET mission: free-floating planets and beyond Shude Mao (Tsinghua University)
12:30–14:00 Lunch
14:00–14:30 The Roman Galactic Exoplanet Survey Scott Gaudi (The Ohio State University)
invited
14:30–14:45 Microlensing Event Modeling for the Roman Galactic Exoplanet Survey David Bennett (NASA Goddard and the University of Maryland)
14:45–15:00 The Roman IPAC/SSC MSOS Photometry pipeline: framework, goals, implementation and early results Sebastiano Calchi Novati (Caltech/IPAC)
15:00–15:15 The Roman IPAC/SSC MSOS Event pipeline: goals, implementation and early results Etienne Bachelet (Caltech/IPAC)
15:15–15:45 Coffee
15:45–16:00 Status of the PRIME Near-Infrared Microlensing Survey: First year Naoki Koshimoto (Osaka University)
16:00–16:15 Update on the Rubin Observatory: survey strategy, commissioning and early data Rachel Street (Las Cumbres Observatory)
16:15–16:30 Impact of Rubin observations in microlensing events detected by Roman Aníbal Varela (Universidad de San Martín)
16:30 End

Thursday, February 1

Time Title Presenter
08:30–09:00 Observing microlensing events with interferometry Antoine Mérand (European Southern Observatory)
invited
09:00–09:15 Towards detection of isolated black holes with ground based observations Eran Ofek & Noam Segev (Weizmann Institute of Science)
remote
09:15–09:30 The pure astrometric microlensing channel: First direct mass of a single white dwarf and prospects for Roman Peter McGill (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)
09:30–09:45 Finding black holes with microlensing: current and future prospects Casey Lam (Carnegie Observatories)
09:45–10:00 Hunting for Black Holes via Astrometric Microlensing with Keck Macy Huston (University of California, Berkeley)
10:00–10:15 Gaia space mission and its astrometric capabilities for microlensing Lukasz Wyrzykowski (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)
10:15–10:30 Analyzing Lens Parameter Distribution: A Case Study of the Gaia18ajz Event Kornel Howil (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)
10:30–11:45 Coffee and poster session
11:45–12:00 Dark microlensing event candidates found in Gaia Katarzyna Kruszynska (Las Cumbres Observatory)
12:00–12:15 Peering into the Underworld: Characterising microlensing events for kicked compact remnants in a Gaia + GaiaNIR future David Sweeney (The University of Sydney)
12:15–12:30 Massive lenses population from Spitzer and Gaia Krzysztof Rybicki (Weizmann Institute of Science)
12:30–12:45 Dark lenses through the dust: microlensing in the near-infrared with the VVV survey Zofia Kaczmarek (Universität Heidelberg)
12:45–13:00 Exploring High-Magnification Microlensing Events from Gaia Uliana Pylypenko (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)
13:00–14:00 Lunch
14:00–14:15 Disentangling the Black Hole Mass Spectrum with Photometric Microlensing Surveys Scott E. Perkins (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)
14:15–14:30 Initial mass function of the Galactic bulge from binary microlensing events Raphael Augusto Pereira de Oliveira (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)
14:30–14:45 Dependence of Planet Frequency on Star Mass and Galactic Distance Kansuke Nunota (Osaka University)
14:45–15:00 Systematic Planetary Anomaly Search for the 2016 KMTNet archive In-Gu Shin (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian)
15:00–15:15 The Mass-Ratio Distribution from KMTNet Jennifer Yee (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian)
15:15–15:30 Coffee
15:30–16:00 The MACHO Project: a historical perspective Charles Alcock (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian)
invited
16:00–16:30 EROS Microlensing Experiment Michel Spiro (International Union of Pure and Applied Physics)
invited
16:30–17:00 Three Decades of the OGLE Survey Andrzej Udalski (Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw)
invited
17:00 End
18:00 Doors open for banquet at Poppy Ridge, food from 18:30

Friday, February 2

Time Title Presenter
08:30–09:00 Free-Floating Planets Takahiro Sumi (Osaka University)
invited
09:00–09:15 Prediction and systematically search for free-float planets in KMTNet survey Qiyue Qian (Tsinghua University)
09:15–09:30 Resolving the Very Low Mass Star Hosting the Super-Earth MOA-2007-BLG-192Lb Sean K Terry (University of Maryland)
09:30–09:45 Gaia22dkvLb: A Microlensing Planet Potentially Accessible to Radial-Velocity Characterization Zexuan Wu (Peking University & Kavli Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics)
09:45–10:00 MOA-2010-BLG-328Lb: a Saturn, Neptune or Super-Earth? Katie Vandorou (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/ UMD)
10:00–10:15 Measuring mass of OGLE-2012-BLG-563 using High Resolution Imaging Aparna Bhattacharya (University of Maryland College Park)
10:15–10:30 The public release of RTModel: a platform for the analysis of microlensing events Valerio Bozza (University of Salerno, Italy)
10:30–11:00 Coffee
11:00–11:15 The Roman Galactic Exoplanet Survey: Prospects for Constraining the Frequency of Earth-Analogs Samson A. Johnson (NASA/JPL)
11:15–11:30 Validating Fisher Matrix Uncertainty Estimates for Roman Galactic Exoplanet Survey Simulations Farzaneh Zohrabi (Louisiana State University)
11:30–11:45 A Code for the Computation of Microlensing of Multiple Systems Vito Saggese (University of Naples Federico II)
11:45–12:00 Generalized photometric neural network framework Greg Olmschenk (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / University of Maryland)
12:00–12:15 SynthPop: A public, modular, python Galactic population synthesis code Matthew Penny (Louisiana State University)
12:15–12:30 Implementation of Automatic Differentiation in Microlensing Light Curve Calculation Haibin Ren (Tsinghua University)
12:30–12:45 Microlensing Black Hole Shadows Himanshu Verma (Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India)
remote
12:45–14:00 Lunch
14:00–14:15 Some stories from a former EROS PHD student Jean-Phillippe Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)
14:15–14:30 The epic of EROS: 30 years of research on microlensing and variable stars Marc Moniez (IN2P3)
14:30–15:45 Discussion Panel Chair: Nicholas Rattenbury (University of Auckland)
Euclid: Eamonn Kerins (University of Manchester)
Roman: Julie McEnry (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)
Rubin: Rachel Street (Las Cumbres Observatory)
15:45–16:00 Closing Remarks
16:00 End

Code of Conduct

The conference organizers are committed to making this meeting productive and enjoyable for everyone, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, nationality, or religion. Harassment of participants in any form will not be tolerated.

To participate at the 26th International Microlensing Conference, please follow these guidelines:

  • Behave professionally.
    Harassment and sexist, racist, or exclusionary comments or jokes are not appropriate. Harassment includes sustained disruption of talks or other events, inappropriate physical contact, sexual attention or innuendo, deliberate intimidation, stalking, and photography or recording of an individual without consent. It also includes offensive comments related to gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race or religion.
  • All communication should be appropriate for a professional audience including people of many different backgrounds. Sexual language and imagery is not appropriate.
  • Be respectful and do not insult or put down other attendees or facilitators of the event. Critique ideas, not people.
  • If participants wish to share photos or contents of talks/slides of any attendee or speaker on social media, we ask that they first get permission.
  • Participants asked to stop any inappropriate behavior are expected to comply immediately. Attendees violating these rules may be asked to leave the event at the sole discretion of the organizers without a refund of any charge.

This code of conduct is adapted from the 25th International microlensing conference and is based on the “London Code of Conduct,” as originally designed for the conference “Accurate Astrophysics. Correct Cosmology,” held in London on July 2015. The London Code of Conduct was adapted with permission by Andrew Pontzen and Hiranya Peiris from a document by Software Carpentry, which itself derives from original Creative Commons documents by PyCon and Geek Feminism. It is released under a CC-Zero license for reuse. To help track people’s improvements and best practice, please retain this acknowledgement, and log your re-use or modification of this policy.

Any participant who wishes to report a violation of this policy is invited to contact, in confidence, Will Dawson, Peter McGill, or Łukasz Wyrzykowski.